creative writing

Lavender Ink, my first radio drama

Script of Lavender Ink by JY Saville and Rosalind Fairclough

We did it! Rosalind Fairclough (who you may know as poet Rosalind York) and I read our way through half an hour of the drama we’d written, live on the radio, and lived to tell the tale. We were fortunate to have technical assistance from Chapel FM‘s Elliot who was thrilled with our comprehensive cue sheet, and in return did a sterling job of dropping in sound effects and music. You can listen to Lavender Ink here, but you might want to read a bit more about it, first.

Having started out saying we were writing a Victorian melodrama, we ended up with an early 1960s drama with events during the second world war referred back to. Previously when Roz and I did reading and discussion programmes with Andrea Hardaker for Writing on Air, we were encouraged to include music to break up the programme, so I always had a musical element in mind. Once I thought about the practical side of two people in a small studio reading for half an hour, I knew we needed to give ourselves the odd rest when the microphones were off. It was most welcome, on the day.

The two eras of the play lent themselves to two different musical styles and we each picked three tracks we thought were appropriate. My character Pat, a less than enthusiastic bride on her wedding day c.1961, I imagined as having a portable record player and liking rock & roll. Roz’s character Marjorie, the bride’s mother, had been dancing during the war to vibrant (and quite rude) songs popular in the late thirties. She chose Bo Carter, Lil Johnson and Bessie Smith.

I initially wanted to stick to English rock & roll, Billy Fury for preference, though I was briefly worried that Pat might be an Adam Faith fan. My dad (a teenager himself in the early sixties) suggested Marty Wilde, so the intro is Billy Fury (Gonna Type a Letter) and the first interlude Marty Wilde (Bad Boy). When Roz and I spent five hours in the pub rewriting the script, the music they were playing was about the right era for Pat, and Shakin All Over by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates stuck in my head for the rest of the evening, to the extent that I decided it had to be one of the tracks in the play despite not being English. It became Pat’s ‘one more song’ before she puts the dress on.

We set the play in the West Riding of Yorkshire, though we never explicitly say where (nearby places are mentioned). That means Pat was written for, and read in, more or less my natural voice, though I tried not to sound too deep for a girl in her late teens.

If you’re a fan of late fifties/early sixties kitchen sink drama then Lavender Ink might be right up your street. If you like my Little Book of Northern Women, you’ll love it. If you want to hear me (39 and gruff) attempt to portray an innocent teenage bride, what are you waiting for? Sister Number One (notoriously hard to impress) has pronounced it ‘very good’.

Lavender Ink by Jacqueline Saville and Rosalind Fairclough – you heard us here first.


Based on a true story

I’ve had a piece of creative nonfiction published this week, at the ever-fabulous flash purveyor Ellipsis Zine, and it feels a bit weird. In a good way. I think.

The first exercise on the Fast Flash workshop I did last month was about the power of recall. Events with strong emotional content are stronger in our memories, said Kathy Fish, and she asked us to dredge up some strong memories, no matter how slight the incident, throw in as much sensory imagery as we could, and write something vivid. The second memory I made a note of was learning to tie a bow in around 1981:

Lying in the dark car, head on Nana’s lap, her face striped by moving orange from the streetlamps, and me reaching up to tie and untie the bow at the neck of her dark dress (black or dark brown, with orange squares or diamonds?). It felt rough, like the skin on her fingers.

If you read The Lesson (as the piece was eventually named at Kathy’s suggestion) you’ll see the essence of the whole thing was right there in that first flood of memory.

As I write this blog post on Monday afternoon, The Lesson has been getting a lot of love on Twitter already, and it’s great to know it’s touching so many people. It’s a big leap from sharing it with a dozen fellow participants on a writing course, who are also sharing (in some cases unbearably sad) memories, to sharing it with anyone in the world who cares to read it. I’ve written a lot of fiction with real cores, but nobody generally knows which bits are real and which bits I made up. Then again, there’s nothing wrong with admitting to loving your grandmother, and if I could look up at her now I think I’d see that smile.

Snowbound, with books

I haven’t given you a random round-up lately. Some of you may have been enjoying the respite, but for those who’ve been wondering what I’m up to apart from the much-mentioned radio drama (less than a fortnight to go), here’s a quick update.

I did one of Kathy Fish’s online Fast Flash workshops (two weeks of intense writing) last month and some of the exercises shoved me out of my comfort zone in a kind of ‘oh, I never knew I could do that’ way. The first product of that to go forth into the world is a piece of creative non-fiction which I’m proud of, but nervous about sharing. It’s going to be up at the fabulous Ellipsis Zine in a couple of weeks.

I’m also going to write about the process of creating a radio drama with a writing partner, and that’s going to be in a very exciting place which I won’t tell you about just yet, but you’ll all be able to read it for free online.

Next will be issue 9 of Confingo, coming out in April, which has a short story of mine that (dare I say it?) is a touch Gaimanesque. While, hopefully, being unarguably Saville-ish.

There’s also a competition I’ve been shortlisted for (and I think will be in the anthology for), which is being frustratingly slow in its public announcement, so all I can do is promise to tell you the details as soon as I can.

That’s it for now. I hope those of you who’ve been snowed in have had plenty of books to read. I’ve been reading, writing, and watching birds make footprints in the snow.

Writing on Air schedule


The schedule for Chapel FM’s Writing on Air festival is now available, you can look at it as a pdf here: 1803 WOA schedule final2

We’re on at 3.45pm on the Friday with our play, Lavender Ink (music now chosen, sound effects procured – we’re almost done). There are also programmes from the Otley Poets, Helen Burke, Oz Hardwick, James Nash, the indefatigable Peter Spafford of course, and Chapel FM regulars Jaimes Lewis Moran and James Fernie, both of whom cropped up in our programme, The Borrowers, last year (sadly now unavailable due to a revamped website).

Remember, if you can’t listen live you’ll be able to listen to the archived programmes afterwards. There’s bound to be something in there that you’ll love.

Coming up to Writing on Air time again


Less than a month till Chapel FM has its annual Writing on Air festival. Roz and I have been busy honing our script, which is called Lavender Ink and is described thus in the brochure (Roz going by her everyday name not her poetry name Rosalind York):

On the morning of Pat’s wedding, at least her mum’s happy. Until she remembers those letters. A 1960s drama from Rosalind Fairclough and JY Saville.

I’ve been influenced, as you might expect, by a blend of the Angry Young Men and Alan Bennett, though you’ll have to tell me whether that comes through, when you listen to Lavender Ink on March 16th. Don’t worry, I’ll remind you again later.

Embracing the Accent by JY Saville

This is a post I wrote this week for a new blog telling the stories of working class writers – I can recommend following it if you’re at all interested in writers or class experience.

Mine, inevitably, is about accent and dialect and is illustrated with a photo of my Nana and her sister.

No Writer Left Behind

Who would have thought the Daily Telegraph would play so prominent a role in the resurgence of my accent? It was during Louise Doughty’s year of writing a weekly column about short stories for them, when they ran a monthly writing competition and hosted a sort of discussion and exercise forum on their website. The Short Story Club had been running a couple of months already when someone (probably my mum) told me the Telegraph was having a writing competition. I entered, but only lurked on the fringes of the online club until May when I plucked up the courage to join in.

At school, we were warned that regional accents were looked down on. Anyone who wanted to get on in life needed to speak in standard English and preferably received pronunciation.

Speaking with an accent was akin to dubious sexual practices: try not to do it at all…

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New flash fiction in Flash, I love you!


Flash, I love you! is the fabulously titled new flash fiction anthology from Paper Swans Press and the table of contents reads like a Who’s Who of flash fiction at the moment. Gratifyingly, it includes one of mine called Life’s Struggles. You can buy a copy at the Paper Swans Press website, it is a lovely item (as well as having great contents) but I admit I was shocked at the price. Don’t blame me, none of it’s coming my way.

If you haven’t yet got the previous anthology with a story of mine in, you can still buy Ellipsis Zine One. It’s cheaper (admittedly the print version is stapled not perfect-bound) and has more stories in, features similarly good writers (some, like me, have stories in both), and it pays royalties to those writers (hurrah for Steve at Ellipsis).