blogging

Thousand Monkeys, Ten Years

Ten years ago, OneMonkey (not that he was known as that yet) said, “I’ve been reading about these new ‘blogs’, I think you should get one.” Dubious, but having learnt in our nearly ten years together that he was not short of good ideas, I let him show me some. Although, since we didn’t have broadband, he had to take me to the library first. “What will I write about?” I asked. I’ve been trying to figure that out ever since.

Back in 2008 I’d been writing on and off since I was a kid, submitting on and off for ten years or more, but I was just beginning to get the odd success and although it felt a little odd (presumptuous, maybe) I did refer to myself as a writer in that first post. Weirdly, right now I’m feeling like less of a writer than I have in a while – after that eighteen months of dedicated writing time I’m back to the situation of those early posts, not quite fitting writing around a day job (even though these days I work four days a week instead of five), procrastinating too much, blogging when I feel like my time would be better spent writing fiction (see also: procrastinating too much). Not to mention that HMRC recently dealt a blow to my self-image by taking away my status of self-employed writer (it’s great that they’ve made it so you have to earn over £1000 from your self-employedness in a year before you need to suffer their bureaucracy, but many a writer’s fragile ego is about to get a good kicking, I suspect).

I doubt I’d have expected to keep at this blog for so long, if I’d given the matter any thought at all when I began. When I wrote those early posts, OneMonkey and I lived with our cat in a rented house with a small garden; I think OneMonkey was a student again and we’d both recently been unemployed for quite a while. Because we didn’t have broadband, I wrote the posts in a text file (on my desktop computer!) then connected to the internet when it was cheap rate, just long enough to paste the words in and press the publish button. We’ve moved twice since then, ending up about fifteen miles away in our own flat with a bigger garden (sadly no longer with the cat) and I’m still behind the times with my not-always-on wi-fi and my laptop instead of a smartphone and constant connectivity, but it does feel like I’ve made a technological leap forward.

I’ve read nearly 500 books since I started this blog, many of which I’ve reviewed, quite a few of which I’ve been given free of charge for that purpose, in fact (man, would I have been excited at the prospect of that, ten years ago). I’ve been to writing workshops, entered competitions, had stories published, got rejections from more and more impressive places. I’ve written fiction that must number in the hundreds of thousands of words. I’ve become a better writer.

What about in another ten years? Will society have reached the stage of direct neural connection to the internet, and will I have upgraded to a smartphone? Will OneMonkey and I have moved again, about to turn fifty (and celebrate our thirtieth anniversary) in a house with a more manageable garden? Will publishers still be dealing with expensive hardbacks, and will I have got my act together and submitted manuscripts of sufficient quality to enough agents that they might also be dealing with me? Who knows, but I’ll keep writing and, all other things being equal, I’ll keep blogging so you’ll be able to find out here.

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Education is about more than getting a job

It being National Short Story Week, you won’t be surprised to hear that I’ve got… an essay about the purpose of education out today (it’s ok, I’ve got a story coming out at Cabinet of Heed on Wednesday). Regular readers will have experienced my passionate views on education before but I’ve summarised a strand or two in Why bother with education? which is my entry to this year’s NUHA Foundation blogging prize.

The topics this year for the prize were:

  1. “Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” – Abraham Lincoln. Do you agree?
  2. “Nobody realises that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.” – Camus. Discuss.
  3. Should the role of education be to prepare students for working life, or to broaden their mind?
  4. “No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally – and often far more worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond.” – C.S. Lewis. Discuss.

Since I suggested topic 3 to them on Twitter earlier in the year I had to pick that one really, though I could have gone to town on topic 2 as well. I haven’t read the higher education bits of The Guardian much since I quit the day job a year ago but by then I was already sick of hundreds of comments (and a few articles) that saw university education in particular as essentially pre-work training. Will it get you a job? Will it increase your salary? Is it applicable in the workplace? Never: Will it give you pleasure? Will it widen your horizons and introduce you to new ideas, lead you to make new connections?

I’m not saying everyone should study every available subject and like it, there were plenty of subjects I couldn’t stand at school and wouldn’t study now. I am saying life can be richer if you’ve studied a variety of things, whether through books, BBC documentaries, or a formal course, and that as an added bonus it probably helps you at work too.

The aim of the blogging prize is to spark debate, so go along and read the essays (particularly mine, obviously: Why bother with education?) then leave your own views.

Accents and globalisation part 2

Further musings on the English language sparked off by listening to Bill Bryson’s Journeys in English last week. This time I want to talk about written vs spoken English in terms of standard use.

Towards the end of the programme they were discussing possible future directions for English. The rise of literacy was mentioned as having changed things somewhat – rather than passing things on verbally, people can read information. Written English has a standard form, a ‘correct’ form that we’re taught and tested on at school, and it’s relatively slow to change. It helps to homogenise the language and stamp out regional forms. The more people read standard English the more it influences the way they formulate their own sentences. The rise of the internet, at first glance, seemed to make that even more likely as international English-speakers read American newspaper websites or the BBC.

However, the more I thought about internet trends (because I know about them, and what the youth are up to. Oh yes) the more I thought about non-standard communication. I might generally write this blog in standard English as I do my usual translation from Yorkshire to proper English in my head, but I’m a lot less formal on sentence structure than I could be and plenty of people write blogs in their own dialects. Then there’s the recorded voice. In the same way that TV, films and radio have an influence on people’s accents and vocabulary, popular podcasts and vlogs will no doubt influence others, but primarily they allow the presenter’s accent to remain in place, maybe introducing their listeners to a new word or phrase here and there.

It remains to be seen how English changes and adapts over the next fifty or a hundred years but if nothing else we’ll have plenty of recordings of how people sounded in the early twenty-first century. I might even add to that myself and record a few more stories to add to the ones you can already listen to.

Week 18: in which I’m not allowed to get big-headed

Where to start this week? I’ve got Twitter fiction in Mslexia, I’ve had a bestselling author send my blog traffic through the roof, and my mum told me off for not making the link to my guest post on the Women Writers School obvious enough.

We’ll start there first in case you, like my mum, were desperate to read that guest post and just couldn’t get to it. It’s called Northerners! Know Your Place, and is at http://womenwritersschool.com/northerners-know-your-place/ (and like most of my other stuff, is accessible via my About page). As you may expect, it’s an article about why I set so much of my writing in the north of England. I may come across as slightly deranged and/or obsessive, but it doesn’t seem to have done me too much harm so far. Honestly, it hasn’t. Ahem.

Many of Kit de Waal‘s Twitter followers visited over the weekend to read a blog post I wrote a few months ago, about class/wealth being a barrier to writing (beyond the hobby level), so if you haven’t already read that you might find it interesting, and if you have already read it you might have missed the follow-up post I wrote this week.

Staying with Twitter, after winning a Twitter fiction competition recently I’ve now got another mini-story in Mslexia magazine, which is quite exciting (and a bit of a surprise – I’d tweeted it to them as part of a challenge, but I don’t actually subscribe so the first I heard was when a friend had spotted it in print). Here’s the story – writers, don’t take it too much to heart:

mslexiatweetfeb2017

A writer praises the North

Since I know you don’t get enough of me writing about the North, and writing, and northern writing, there’s an article of mine over at Women Writers School about that very thing.

Rusting anchor on stony beach

An anchor I saw in Cumbria, not the one that tethers me to the north

You’ll recognise it by the photo above, and my unbridled enthusiasm. And the mention of Luddites. Some of the other writers that Laurie Garrison has invited to add to her Literature and Place theme have covered exotic places like San Francisco and Bhutan so you can be an international jet-setter from the comfort of your armchair.

As ever, thoughts welcome. Do you love all my references to northern this, that and the other or do you sigh every time it comes up? Does fiction set in a place that’s familiar to you have an additional hook, or do you like reading yourself into places you’ll never visit? If you’re a writer too, is there somewhere that has that magic for you?

An essay, a story, a couple of reviews

It looks like I’ve neglected to tell you what I’ve been up to lately. I entered an essay into this year’s NUHA Blogging Prize, on the topic of ‘Do schools and universities have a responsibility to educate their students on social behaviour alongside the academic?’ and you can read it (and comment on it) here. It’s already sparked a bit of discussion, not least in the Monkey household.

I’ve also got a short (just under 500 words) story in issue 8 of Firefly Magazine, which you can read online here.

Before that came out I reviewed a fast-paced sci-fi novel, vN by Madeline Ashby, over at Luna Station Quarterly, and a book on spelling, grammar and punctuation at The Bookbag. Bits of it reminded me of Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson, but it never quite lived up to its promise. And I still don’t know the proper names for all the parts of a sentence, I just use them as they fit best. Reading hundreds of books for fun over the last 35 years has no doubt helped with that.

So there you are, that’s you (loyal reader) all caught up. Enjoy the rest of your Sunday.

Self-censorship on the web

When I’m in the right mood I’m happy to share my opinions, often loudly and at great length. The only thing that stops me is shyness (as Morrissey said, Shyness is nice but shyness can stop you from doing all the things in life you’d like to), but that doesn’t hold in writing so in theory I should be unleashing my thoughts left, right and centre. In theory.

Putting ideas in writing means they can come back to haunt you, and if you do it in public they can be read by people you’d rather keep them away from, people who might misinterpret, deliberately misquote or twist your words and use them against you. Those words can survive long after you’ve changed your mind, grown up, or realised what your misinterpretation of a long and clever-sounding word made you sound like you were saying. Which of course makes me wonder why I (or anyone else) would want to bother. Sometimes I nearly don’t: I agonise over a blog post for hours, or I write and rewrite a comment destined for someone else’s blog and then abandon it, deciding that the paragraph of explanation and disclaimers would kill the witty one-liner I originally came up with (and ok, maybe it wasn’t that witty anyway).

In an argument (or ‘debate’ if you prefer) in person there’s room for back and forth, you can immediately step in to correct someone when you realise they misheard or misinterpreted what you said, or if you think you need to clarify. If I comment on a stranger’s blog (a stranger who knows nothing about my views or background, and whose first language may not be English. Or worse, whose first language is a different dialect of English where shared words don’t always have shared meanings) I run the risk of offending them, or one of their subsequent readers, and I won’t be there to defend myself. They will forever hold an unnecessarily tainted view of me.

I wouldn’t have this problem in a story, all beliefs and viewpoints can be said to be the fictional narrator’s, even if I do share some of them. Maybe what I need to do to free myself up is create an online alter-ego and write all future blog comments in character.