Blog tour guest from the Short Story Club

Welcome, Jo Tiddy, next stop on the My Writing Process blog tour. Take it away, Jo…

It was great to hear from Thousand Monkeys, a stalwart of the Telegraph Short Story Club, and be asked to submit my thoughts on what I write and why. Thank you also for hosting me. Alas for the blog world out there, the tour is likely to come to a crashing stop with me. I am a luddite, I operate on a steam powered laptop, I can’t get my head round twitter and I don’t have a blog, Neither do I know many writing people who do, except those who have already been on the tour. So, sorry chaps, in advance. With hope, and a fair wind behind me, I will grasp this whole blogging thing and get set up….

What am I working on?

I am working on a number of things. Or should be. However I have changed jobs, moved house and waved No 1 child off to university in the course of the past few weeks, so not much writing has been done. I mostly write short stories, on all sorts of topics, though I like to visit my own past as a child growing up in Africa.

I have also been working on a novel for teens, with a medieval bent, though it’s set in a dystopian future, just like 5 million other YA novels currently out there. I am losing interest in it fast it must be said. I am thinking of revisiting a novel I started on some time ago, set in 16th century East Africa during the Portuguese occupation of the Swahili coast. What I really need to do is get back into some sort of routine(see below), and get on with it.

Although I don’t specifically write for younger children I have contributed to the upcoming Mumsnet/Walker Book of Animal Stories, published October 2. Maybe this is a direction I could focus on more in the future.

How does my work differ from other in its genre?

I don’t have a genre as such. I’m not a romance writer, or even slightly funny – I can’t do comedy. Obviously my YA novel is identical to every other one in the field. I trained as a historian, so I like to incorporate historical elements into my stories; the ones set in the past tend to have been more successful than any modern stuff I write. I would like my writing to be different to anyone else’s – I suspect that it’s not.

My new job is in an independent bookshop, http://thebookhousethame.co.uk/ which is a fantastic place to work. The main problem is that I am now aware of how many books are out there in so many genres, and I will never get a chance to read them all.

Why do you write what you do?

I’m quite new to writing. I used to tinker, but was busy carving out a career in local government (boo), raising a family, having a life. Three years ago I developed ME and life changed overnight. I spent 6 months on the sofa weeping with self-pity and despair. Eventually I turned to writing as a way of dealing with it. I found that raging at the page was a great way of offloading, and saving my family from having to listen to me whine. I began to get some semblance of a life back, albeit at a much slower level. Much of what I write tends to have dark undertones, layers of the anxiety that I often have to fight. But I am a believer in redemption, and the thought that even during dark times there is always hope. I think this comes across in the things I write. I’m also drawn to childhood memories, growing up in Africa and changing that lifestyle for a completely different continent when I was eighteen has left its mark on me, left me feeling, at times, rootless.

My writing process

I find my best ideas come from prompts. The Short Story Club has always been brilliant for this, throwing out an idea, or a phrase, and letting us all just run with it. The members have been so supportive, and friendly, and open hearted, and many of my stories have had their genesis there. It’s useful to have the feedback. Otherwise I delve into memories, or listen to music, pick up a refrain and build a story from that. I read a lot – too much sometimes; it’s a great displacement activity. Any of this can spark a story off.

When I was working lunchtimes in a school my day had a bit of routine. Get up, offload kids, walk dog, do morning pages (a la Julia Cameron). Half an hour or so of just scribbling anything that came into my head onto a blank page, always black fountain pen, always longhand, mostly whingeing. Go to work, come home, do it in reverse. Solitary dog walking is great, not only for observing changes in a familiar place during the course of the seasons, but for tramping out ideas. If I got stuck I’d disappear off to my shed and sew – another fairly mindless activity that allowed my brain to unravel knots. Now though, I work three full days a week and am often too tired to think by the end of them. I’ve moved, from suburbia to the wilds of the countryside, a low lying village surrounded by floodplain and wet for half the year. The land around has never been cultivated, is a palimpsest of older times – strip lynchets, old drovers routes, these all remain. It’s quiet, so quiet, and my “home” days are longer. I will need to construct a new routine, and find new paths to walk in this undiscovered countryside.

I do belong to a writers group – we are a small and haphazard bunch, who really need to get organised. We meet up once a month, to discuss our writing, but like many book clubs we descend into gossip and chat quite quickly. It’s useful to have the feedback, but we are all working on different things. There is talk of a blog (hah) – maybe that will happen once I’ve got to grips with sorting my own out.

Apologies for having no one to pass this on to as yet. I have asked around, and as soon as I do I will link it up on twitter. I have been asked to talk to a group of A2 students at the local college about short story writing, so I think that I will direct them to this blog tour so they can explore the huge variety of writers and their different approaches to the craft. Being young and tech savvy they will have no problems……

In the meantime you can find me on Twitter: @jo_tiddy, @the_book_house. (I think)

 

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One comment

  1. This reads like a novella epic, Jo. Well done you. Hope ruralness is not too unruly for you. We, too, have been shipping no 1 son off to uni and all that entails. Just returned this evening from Lancaster where he is now in the full force of Freshers’ Week.

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